The Congress dress code may be sexist, but surely it is men who are disadvantaged!

Is it really the women who are the “victims” of the so-called “sexist” Congress dress code?

 

It is astonishing how dress codes are always portrayed as being sexist to the disadvantage of women. With apologies to the gentleman standing with Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, I have no idea who he is is: nevertheless he illustrates nicely the outrageous nature of the claim that women are hard done by when it comes to dress codes. The Congress dress code is, indeed, sexist, but it is the men who are the victims.

Apparently, the dress worn by the woman on Michelle’s left is acceptable, because it has sleeves, but Michelle’s dress is not, because it is sleeveless. Congresswomen and reporters are claiming that this is sexist because dresses like that worn by Jill Biden are unbearably hot in the summer. However, compare the comfort of the outfits worn by both these women to that of the men, who are forced to wear not only a shirt (the equivalent of a dress with sleeves), but, in addition, a heavy jacket and a tie. The difference in comfort between the two women is undeniably trivial compared to the difference between either woman and any of the men in the audience. Even if a man were to rebel, take off his jacket and tie and roll up his sleeves, he would still be no better off than a woman in a dress like Jill Biden’s!

Please can we lose the constant political correctness and get some sense of reality in the sexist dress codes debate? Women nearly always have more freedom, flexibility and comfort than men when it comes to what they are allowed to wear at work, whether in Congress or anywhere else. By all means let the women wear sleeveless dresses, but also allow the men to ditch their jackets and ties. Gender equality should by now be sufficiently entrenched to allow men and women the same degree of freedom and comfort in what they wear, whether in Congress or elsewhere.